National Geographic ( @natgeo ) Instagram Profile

natgeo

National Geographic

  • 23213 posts
  • 142213493 followers
  • 138 following

National Geographic Profile Information

Photo by @renan_ozturk A "moon walk," captured without digital manipulation within a single frame. This is dedicated to our late friend Dean Potter, who first envisioned a free-solo image like this. Pictured here is Andy Lewis, walking a gap high above the valley floor in Moab, Utah. I shot this image from three km (two miles) away, after navigating cliffy terrain with a huge 600mm lens, which truly pushed my physical capabilities, knowledge of the landscape, and all the technology abused in the process. After questing deep into the wilderness and missing the shot for the moonrise/sunset moment, I stumbled through the night, arriving tired and bloody to the moonset/sunrise location on the opposite side of the towers. This moment of alignment lasted for about one minute and only a few frames. It give me such hope to witness such artistic acts of humanity in these times! See @renan_ozturk for more on the backstory and images from this endeavor. #moonwalk #slackline

Photo by @renan_ozturk  A
356163 1937 8 hours ago

Photo by @beverlyjoubert They may not have the speed of the cheetah or the sheer brawn of the lion, but leopards have their own superpowers. There’s their famed adaptability, which sees to it that these flexible felines can acclimate to a range of landscapes, even ones heavily modified by humans. And then there’s that stealthy ability to go unnoticed, to slink their way ghost-like on the edges of perception. It’s a powerful combination for a wild creature. But perhaps it’s that very inconspicuousness, and our impression of them as so resiliently adaptable, that can make us overlook just how vulnerable these cats are to a growing number of threats. It is on our watch, after all, that leopards have lost huge swaths of their territory and many populations have suffered alarming declines. It is time we pay more attention. #leopards #bigcats #bigcatconservation

Photo by @beverlyjoubert  They may not have the speed of the cheetah or the sheer brawn of the lion, but leopards have their own superpowers. There’s their famed adaptability, which sees to it that these flexible felines can acclimate to a range of landscapes, even ones heavily modified by humans. And then there’s that stealthy ability to go unnoticed, to slink their way ghost-like on the edges of perception. It’s a powerful combination for a wild creature. But perhaps it’s that very inconspicuousness, and our impression of them as so resiliently adaptable, that can make us overlook just how vulnerable these cats are to a growing number of threats. It is on our watch, after all, that leopards have lost huge swaths of their territory and many populations have suffered alarming declines. It is time we pay more attention. #leopards #bigcats #bigcatconservation
243820 709 12 hours ago

Photos by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto I climbed up and through this labyrinth of bamboo stilt houses, some as tall as three stories, in search of the perfect sunset. Kampong Chnang stilt village, as seen in 1992, was built to withstand the 30-foot rise and fall of Tonle Sap (Great Lake) between Cambodia's wet and dry seasons. This is the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia and the only waterway in the world that actually changes direction twice a year. During the wet season, June through October, excess water flows northward and upriver into the lake, swelling it to five times its size. Come the dry season, November to May, the river reverses its flow, gradually draining the lake and regulating the water that reaches the delta in the south, keeping it constantly supplied throughout the year. Today Tonle Sap is in serious trouble. Drought, dam building, and overfishing have brought it to a tipping point. As the lake goes, so goes the greater Mekong ecosystem. A devastating drought last year left the Mekong River at its lowest level in recorded history. And as the Mekong goes, so goes Tonle Sap— and the livelihoods of the fishermen who live in this architectural wonder. Pray for rain. For more on the Mekong, please follow @yamashitaphoto #tonlesaplake #stilthouse #stiltvillage #tonlesap #cambodia

Photos by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto  I climbed up and through this labyrinth of bamboo stilt houses, some as tall as three stories, in search of the perfect sunset. Kampong Chnang stilt village, as seen in 1992, was built to withstand the 30-foot rise and fall of Tonle Sap (Great Lake) between Cambodia's wet and dry seasons. This is the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia and the only waterway in the world that actually changes direction twice a year. During the wet season, June through October, excess water flows northward and upriver into the lake, swelling it to five times its size. Come the dry season, November to May, the river reverses its flow, gradually draining the lake and regulating the water that reaches the delta in the south, keeping it constantly supplied throughout the year. 

Today Tonle Sap is in serious trouble. Drought, dam building, and overfishing have brought it to a tipping point. As the lake goes, so goes the greater Mekong ecosystem. A devastating drought last year left the Mekong River at its lowest level in recorded history. And as the Mekong goes, so goes Tonle Sap— and the livelihoods of the fishermen who live in this architectural wonder. Pray for rain. For more on the Mekong, please follow @yamashitaphoto  #tonlesaplake #stilthouse #stiltvillage #tonlesap #cambodia
165035 466 15 hours ago

Photos by @stephenwilkes NEOWISE is a long-period comet discovered by astronomers on March 27. At that time, it was 190 million miles away from the sun and 160 million miles away from Earth. By July, it was bright enough to be seen by the naked eye. It’s one of the brightest comets in the northern hemisphere in the last 23 years. I took this on Block Island. A beautiful, clear night allowed me to capture the subtle color changes in the comet and the details of the sky, about an hour after sunset. Definitely worth the effort to see this magic. I feel fortunate to have captured the comet as it won’t be visible again for another 6,800 years. To see more from my travels near and far follow me @stephenwilkes. #neowise #comet #fujifilm #GFX100 #blockisland

Photos by @stephenwilkes  NEOWISE is a long-period comet discovered by astronomers on March 27. At that time, it was 190 million miles away from the sun and 160 million miles away from Earth. By July, it was bright enough to be seen by the naked eye. It’s one of the brightest comets in the northern hemisphere in the last 23 years.

I took this on Block Island. A beautiful, clear night allowed me to capture the subtle color changes in the comet and the details of the sky, about an hour after sunset. Definitely worth the effort to see this magic. I feel fortunate to have captured the comet as it won’t be visible again for another 6,800 years. To see more from my travels near and far follow me @stephenwilkes. #neowise #comet #fujifilm #GFX100 #blockisland
403219 1293 19 hours ago

Photo by @joelsartore I Looking for a simple way to help protect chimpanzees, like Ruben, in the wild? Go on a scavenger hunt around your house for old phones and small electronics, then take a trip to your local zoo or electronics store and recycle them! Coltan, a mineral used in our handheld electronics, is often destructively mined in central Africa—an area that is home to many species, like chimpanzees, gorillas, and okapi. When recycled, materials like tantalum from these electronics can be reused, reducing the demand for this material to be mined from this vital habitat. This wildlife-saving action also keeps battery waste containing harmful chemicals out of our landfills, local habitats, and waterways, protecting local species and our local communities! Photo taken @zootampa. To see more species featured in the Photo Ark, follow me @joelsartore. #PhotoArk #savetogether

Photo by @joelsartore I Looking for a simple way to help protect chimpanzees, like Ruben, in the wild? Go on a scavenger hunt around your house for old phones and small electronics, then take a trip to your local zoo or electronics store and recycle them! Coltan, a mineral used in our handheld electronics, is often destructively mined in central Africa—an area that is home to many species, like chimpanzees, gorillas, and okapi. When recycled, materials like tantalum from these electronics can be reused, reducing the demand for this material to be mined from this vital habitat. This wildlife-saving action also keeps battery waste containing harmful chemicals out of our landfills, local habitats, and waterways, protecting local species and our local communities! Photo taken @zootampa. To see more species featured in the Photo Ark, follow me @joelsartore. #PhotoArk #savetogether
743205 6152 23 hours ago

Photo by Pete McBride @pedromcbride Samburu warriors sing and dance in the arid landscape of Kenya. The male warriors, known as moran, are the defenders of the pastoralist Samburu tribe. Singing, clapping, and dancing are integral to their traditional ceremonies—as well as a way of socializing. Some Samburu have been on the front lines of conservation efforts throughout northern Kenya. To see more from Kenya, follow @pedromcbride. @savetheelephants #Kenya #dance #Samburu

Photo by Pete McBride @pedromcbride  Samburu warriors sing and dance in the arid landscape of Kenya. The male warriors, known as moran, are the defenders of the pastoralist Samburu tribe. Singing, clapping, and dancing are integral to their traditional ceremonies—as well as a way of socializing. Some Samburu have been on the front lines of conservation efforts throughout northern Kenya. To see more from Kenya, follow @pedromcbride. @savetheelephants #Kenya #dance #Samburu
184067 599 27 hours ago

Photo by @paolowoods and @gabrielegalimbertiphoto Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Italy has been in total lockdown for over two months. The country’s museums were closed and deserted. Italy has the highest number of UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world, but tourism has come to a complete and painful halt. What do these museums look like devoid of visitors? How do the artworks fare without those that appreciate them? Thanks to the COVID-19 Visual Project, an initiative by Cortona On The Move festival, in partnership with Intesa Sanpaolo, we’ve had the unique opportunity to be the only visitors allowed in some of the most iconic museums in Italy. We have tried to pull them out of the darkness and reinvent them through light. We call this project Locked in Beauty. It's been published in National Geographic and is on exhibit at the festival until the end of September. In this photo: Museo dell’Accademia, Florence, "David," by Michelangelo. #covid19 #art #italy #gallerieditalia #museum

Photo by @paolowoods and @gabrielegalimbertiphoto  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Italy has been in total lockdown for over two months. The country’s museums were closed and deserted. Italy has the highest number of UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world, but tourism has come to a complete and painful halt. What do these museums look like devoid of visitors? How do the artworks fare without those that appreciate them? Thanks to the COVID-19 Visual Project, an initiative by Cortona On The Move festival, in partnership with Intesa Sanpaolo, we’ve had the unique opportunity to be the only visitors allowed in some of the most iconic museums in Italy. We have tried to pull them out of the darkness and reinvent them through light. We call this project Locked in Beauty. It's been published in National Geographic and is on exhibit at the festival until the end of September. In this photo: Museo dell’Accademia, Florence,
307673 1407 36 hours ago

Photo by @williamalbertallard Palermo, Sicily, 1994: Laundry seems to soar like great birds in flight on lines strung from tenement buildings in an old neighborhood. Sicily was an incredible place to document. It's a wonderful visual resource, with people who aren't camera-shy, who are full of life and vigor. And the food, oh, how good it is! For more images of Sicily and other assignments spanning a five-decade career #followme @williamalbertallard. #palermo #sicily #filmphotography #streetphotography

Photo by @williamalbertallard  Palermo, Sicily, 1994: Laundry seems to soar like great birds in flight on lines strung from tenement buildings in an old neighborhood. Sicily was an  incredible place to document. It's a wonderful visual resource, with people who aren't camera-shy, who are full of life and vigor. And the food, oh, how good it is! For more images of Sicily and other assignments spanning a five-decade career #followme @williamalbertallard. #palermo #sicily #filmphotography #streetphotography
191817 613 40 hours ago

Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown A Uygur man enters a mosque in the Old City of Kashgar, China. For more than 2,000 years, Kashgar has been an center of trade and cultural exchange, strategically located along the Silk Road. Kashgar’s Old City was called the “best-preserved example of a traditional Islamic city to be found anywhere in central Asia,” according to architect and historian George Michell. When I was there, in 2009, large sections of the old city were being razed. A small section remains, where the vital spirit of the Uygur people who inhabit the city can still be seen. Follow @michaelchristopherbrown for more human stories around the world.

Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown  A Uygur man enters a mosque in the Old City of Kashgar, China. For more than 2,000 years, Kashgar has been an center of trade and cultural exchange, strategically located along the Silk Road. Kashgar’s Old City was called the “best-preserved example of a traditional Islamic city to be found anywhere in central Asia,” according to architect and historian George Michell. When I was there, in 2009, large sections of the old city were being razed. A small section remains, where the vital spirit of the Uygur people who inhabit the city can still be seen. Follow @michaelchristopherbrown for more human stories around the world.
174628 790 43 hours ago

Photo by @paoloverzone Taouz, Morocco. Samir Zouhri, professor of paleontology at Hassan II University of Casablanca, holds a large Spinosaurus tooth. Spinosaurus was one of the largest predatory dinosaurs of all time. It is named after the elongated dorsal spines that supported an enormous “sail” of skin. In contrast with other dinosaurs–predominantly terrestrial–a long list of anatomical features indicates that Spinosaurus was adapted to live in freshwater, like crocodiles and hippopotamuses. Follow me @paoloverzone for more photos and stories. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.

Photo by @paoloverzone  Taouz, Morocco. Samir Zouhri, professor of paleontology at Hassan II University of Casablanca, holds a large Spinosaurus tooth. Spinosaurus was one of the largest predatory dinosaurs of all time. It is named after the elongated dorsal spines that supported an enormous “sail” of skin. In contrast with other dinosaurs–predominantly terrestrial–a long list of anatomical features indicates that Spinosaurus was adapted to live in freshwater, like crocodiles and hippopotamuses. Follow me @paoloverzone for more photos and stories.

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
149306 414 47 hours ago

Photo by @dina_litovsky An Amish family waits for a bus in Pinecraft, Florida. For many decades, Amish and Mennonite families from around the U.S. have been taking winter vacations in Pinecraft, a small neighborhood in Sarasota. The strict rules of Anabaptist life are temporarily relaxed, as hard work is replaced by leisure and recreational activities. For more images, follow me @dina_litovsky.

Photo by @dina_litovsky  An Amish family waits for a bus in Pinecraft, Florida. For many decades, Amish and Mennonite families from around the U.S. have been taking winter vacations in Pinecraft, a small neighborhood in Sarasota. The strict rules of Anabaptist life are temporarily relaxed, as hard work is replaced by leisure and recreational activities. For more images, follow me @dina_litovsky.
219134 1224 2 days ago

Photo by @nicholesobecki Girls recite the Quran in a madrassa in Dadaab, in northern Kenya. Refugee camps are meant to be temporary solutions to acute crises, but Dadaab, which opened in 1991, is proof that some crises may drag on for lifetimes, a likely reality for many people fleeing climate change. Refugees living in camps are isolated from society—they can’t leave to pursue opportunities or build a future. To see more of my work on humanity’s connection to the natural world, please follow @nicholesobecki. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.

Photo by @nicholesobecki  Girls recite the Quran in a madrassa in Dadaab, in northern Kenya. Refugee camps are meant to be temporary solutions to acute crises, but Dadaab, which opened in 1991, is proof that some crises may drag on for lifetimes, a likely reality for many people fleeing climate change. Refugees living in camps are isolated from society—they can’t leave to pursue opportunities or build a future. To see more of my work on humanity’s connection to the natural world, please follow @nicholesobecki.

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
148238 517 2 days ago